Clonycavan Man: A 2,300-Year-Old Murder Mystery

In March 2003, the body of a man who lived during the Iron Age was discovered in a peat bog in Ireland. Known as the Clonycavan Man, the well-preserved remains indicate that the body was not that of a man who died a natural or honorable death, but one who was brutally murdered. For more than a decade, archaeologists have been trying to unravel this ancient murder mystery. 

Read more …

First Feast? The Burial at the Hilazon Tachtit Cave Site

In a large but remote cave in Galilee, archaeologists made a very unusual discovery – the 12,000-year-old elaborate burial of a woman set apart from a communal grave with 28 other human bodies. Her burial contained numerous animal remains placed carefully around and on top of her, and researchers found what they believe to be the leftovers of a great feast that took place in her honour. Many questions still remain regarding this unique and special discovery.  

Read more …

Ten Amazing Cities from the Ancient World

From cities that lay hidden for millennia under desert sands, to Bronze Age metropolises, jungle cities, and entire complexes constructed on coral reefs, giant rocks, underground caverns, or carved into cliff faces, we feature ten amazing cities from the ancient world, though there are many, many more that continue to inspire and intrigue us in the modern day.

Read more …

Did Ancient People Really Have Lifespans Longer Than 200 Years?

Ancient texts from many cultures have listed life spans most modern people find simply and literally unbelievable. Some say it’s due to misunderstandings in the translation process, or that the numbers have symbolic meaning—but against the many explanations are also counterarguments that leave the historian wondering whether the human lifespan has actually decreased so significantly over thousands of years.

Read more …

Archaeologists reveal astounding Bronze Age microscopic gold work from around Stonehenge

Archaeologists have revealed the process utilized by highly-skilled craftsmen to create the magnificent gold artifacts that were found around Stonehenge, such as a dagger handle adorned with up to 140,000 tiny gold studs just a third of a millimetre wide.  

Read more …

The Curious Phaistos Disc – Ancient Mystery or Clever Hoax?

In 1908 an Italian archaeologist ventured into the ruins of Phaistos, an ancient Minoan palace on the south coast of Crete. In an underground temple depository, among burnt bones, dust, and ashes, he found a remarkably intact golden-hued disc covered in a strange set of hieroglyphs. The discovery of the ‘Phaistos Disc’ is known as one of the most famous mysteries in archaeology as the strange symbols have never been deciphered – raising some to question whether the artifact is authentic or rather part of an elaborate hoax.

Read more …

The Mystery of the San Pedro Mountains Mummy

In June 1934, two gold prospectors, who had been digging and blasting for gold within the San Pedro Mountains in Wyoming, came across a small cavern buried deep within the thick rock. When the dust began to settle, the prospectors made a startling discovery – the well-preserved, but long-forgotten, remains of a tiny human.

Read more …